Real life Barbie

When a human being not only resembles a caricature but plays up to that caricature, sure it’s her own business but still … don’t you find that the teensiest bit offputting?

The thing is – they actually do exist in Russia, those dolls and I’ve been privileged enough [?] to have been in the kitchen with some of them, drinking their tea and talking.  Can you imagine the effect on the brain of one of those in close proximity, obliviously chatting about the time of day or whatever?

And they do talk and think and laugh and give the lie to the image they themselves have created.  Every second girl over there has tried modelling, with about 70% of that demographic probably falling into the “gorgeous” category.

Yet there’s something not quite there, some missing element I was never able to get to the bottom of, so to speak.  There was always something slightly artificial, preoccupied with image, wanting everything to be “just so” and that trumped anything else, e.g. in-depth discussions.

I think we’re meant to buy the projected image, rather than go for the premium package including the humanity behind it.  Part of this is their reserve in matters private and in their aspirations.  Rare to find a “let it all hang out”, “I’m going to inflict my lard and my shrieking on you whether you want it or not” female over there.

At least not until a later age, when they’ve given up.

One aspect of Russians which affects the women, of course, is the roles.  In Russia, it’s straight down the line.  Less so now but pharmacists wore certain uniforms, as did doctors and sanitary inspectors.  Little boys were real little boys and little girls were real little girls and both were children, as distinct from the monstrous mini-adults we’re producing.

You were expected to be married and have kids and if not, why not?  Girls were married by 21.  Boys were meant to drink too much vodka.  Politicians were meant to be corrupt.

You could almost call it an orthodox society, rarely deviating, except in the big cities.  It’s a Moscow-centric society too.

So this Barbie in the pic above – you’d have the pleasure of her company for as long as you could produce or perform but then it would fade away and someone else would be front and centre.

A very weird feeling and yet not unpleasant.

I think.

The ones I knew were far more real but they did often dress this way

5 comments for “Real life Barbie

  1. Sackerson
    May 5, 2012 at 16:52

    Chuck another prawn on the Barbie, mate.

  2. May 5, 2012 at 18:24

    Think Barbie’s American originally, Sackers.

  3. May 5, 2012 at 20:35

    “When a human being not only resembles a caricature but plays up to that caricature, sure it’s her own business but still … don’t you find that the teensiest bit offputting?”

    Yes I do, but maybe it works often enough to be worth a try. In other words maybe it’s a percentage game.

  4. May 6, 2012 at 12:59

    The only thing I find off putting are the enlarged breasts.

  5. Sackerson
    May 6, 2012 at 16:25

    Any sign of Ken yet?

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