Bastille Day

Tremblez, tyrans et vous perfides
L’opprobre de tous les partis
Tremblez! vos projets parricides
Vont enfin recevoir leurs prix!
Tout est soldat pour vous combattre
S’ils tombent, nos jeunes héros
La France en produit de nouveaux,
Contre vous tout prêts à se battre.

Rousing stuff and yet behind the scenes, traitors pretending to love the people wrought their handiwork.  So many of those held to be heroes in folk memory turn out to have been traitors to humanity, if that means lessening the lot of the human being and leading him into greater tyranny than he has just departed.

To consider the French Revolution, one must consider Voltaire.  To consider Voltaire, one must consider Antonio Schinella Conti. Schiller:

A Venetian nobleman, originally a follower of Descartes, who lived for a time in Paris, where he was close to Malebranche, Conti went to London where he became a friend of Sir Isaac Newton. Conti directed the operations that made Newton an international celebrity, including especially the creation of a pro-Newton party of French Anglophiles and Anglomaniacs who came to be known as the French Enlightenment. Conti’s agents in this effort included Montesquieu and Voltaire.

The “Enlightenment” scholars, scientists and philosophers were forever directing attention away from people such as Kepler and Leibnitz and onto people who were under the patronage of the power which Schiller calls Venetian but you could equally call Them. Secularist, atheist, communist, destructive and yet in thrall to usury. This is the power which right now is moving the world towards global governance and establishment of the new oligarchy. It’s never changed. It explains the champagne socialists, who are, in fact, greedy bandits. Sutherland and Mandelson spring to mind.

Churchill wrote of this power and named names.

The Conti conversazione was also sponsored by the Emo and Memmo oligarchical families. Participants included Giammaria Ortes, the Venetian economist who asserted that the carrying capacity of the planet Earth could never exceed three billion persons. Ortes was a student of the pro-Galileo activist Guido Grandi of Pisa. Ortes applied Newton’s method to the so-called social sciences. Ortes denied the possibility of progress or higher standards of living, supported free trade, opposed dirigist economics, and polemicized against the ideas of the American Revolution.

The ideas of Conti, Ortes, and their network were brought into Great Britain under the supervision of William Petty, the Earl of Shelburne, who was the de facto doge of the British oligarchy around the time of the American Revolution. The Shelburne stable of writers, including Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham, Thomas Malthus, James Mill, John Stuart Mill, Charles Darwin, and other exponents of British philosophical radicalism, all take their main ideas from Conti and especially Ortes.

Francesco Algarotti, author of a treatise on “Newtonian Science for Ladies,” was another Venetian in the orbit of the Conti conversazione. Algarotti was close to Voltaire, and, along with the French scientist Pierre Louis de Maupertuis, he helped form the homosexual harem around British ally Frederick the Great of Prussia.

Homosexuality is never far away from this milieu, along with militaristic glory, whether for the aristocrats or the common peasantry. There is no innate caring for the peasantry in any of this – it’s all worship of unsustainable ideas which would invoke the greatest bloodshed. That they would latch onto, infiltrate and adopt the livery of noble causes such as freedom and a fair deal for the peasantry conceals what these people were always about – dividing and ruling the common people in the interests of maintaining the oligarchy.

That this can be labelled rubbish by the majority shows the extent that Voltaire, for example, has been misunderstood. Even Victor Hugo was sucked in.

Frederick made Algarotti president of the Berlin Academy of Sciences, also corresponding with Voltaire all his life; Voltaire lived at Sans Souci and Berlin between 1750 and 1753. A measure of his destructive influence was in the later sympathy of Soviet writers for figures like Galileo, Newton, and Voltaire as ancestors of what was later called Dialectical Materialism.

Things in the world of great movements are never without their catalysts and those catalysts have been in place long before the spark appears.

French flagFor example, many think the EU a natural corollary to the EEC, when in fact it was the brainchild of the Club of Rome, including its British agents such as Wilson and Heath. See Edward Spalton and others on this.

This power knows no political parties and no nationhood, only the original families.

So, on July 14th, at the Bastille, the French people little knew what they were letting themselves in for. To this day, almost all don’t know who was behind the scenes, influencing it and who was behind them.

4 Responses to “Bastille Day”

  1. dearieme July 15, 2012 at 10:40 Permalink

    Tram with the Goldkette Victor Orchestra and Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra.

    Just as the record companies were reluctant to record and release waltzes by the black orchestra of Fletcher Henderson, they shied from the hot music of Jean Goldkette. A crisp, if slightly restrained, track is this one from 1927, with Tram a leading light.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDoK5SzXxCA

    This 1927 track swings: Tram doesn’t get a solo but leads the saxes
    commandingly.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rvokzr0YBo

    This, critics argue, is the sort of jazz that got the band its reputation
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rd1G1Nee00

    When the Goldkette band dissolved, Tram and Bix joined Whiteman’s light music ensemble.

    Tram shines on a 1928 track of a tune I’ve warmed to recently: “Ain’t no sweet man worth the salt of my tears”.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9x9ub33ucT0

    He also shows up well on this 1929 version of the jazz warhorse China Boy
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyM6kg10UYE

    Our last track has a 1928 Tram and Bix “chase chorus”, a sparkling duet on a splendid Rogers and Hart song.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRk3qa2Icbk

  2. James Higham July 15, 2012 at 10:42 Permalink

    Was getting a bit worried. ;-)

  3. dearieme July 15, 2012 at 10:54 Permalink

    Hob, you may prefer to use this cleaner version of Ain’t No Sweet Man
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA2ygiOKNAc&feature=related

  4. James Higham July 15, 2012 at 11:42 Permalink

    Let’s offer it as an alternative.

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