The Jews [8]

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The Jews 11

The Temple

It’s not possible to complete a look at the Jews without that Solomon’s Temple or in particular today, the rebuilding of the Third Temple.  Watch carefully the moves in East Jerusalem right now for resettlement, new Jewish housing.

Beneath the Temple mount, it is believed by the other side [the real other side, not the Muslims], a belief that stemmed from the Frankish [read Merovingian] troops [otherwise known as Red Cross Crusaders at the time] that there were great secrets below that mount, currently squatted upon by the Muslims.

If the Muslims can’t be pushed off that mount without creating conditions in western nations where the Muslims are detested so much that a new Crusade by western nations – military again – goes ahead – if that can’t be done, ushering in the Har Megiddon endtimes, then the next best thing is to tunnel under the mount but to do that, you have to get to it first and what better way than to have Jewish housing right up next to it.

The constant of Christian eschatology is that the Jews find themselves a leader, a champion, but that champion turns out to be the enemy of Jewry, the enemy of humanity as a whole.  This is the abomination of desolation.

And that turns on access to the mount.

Some reading

There was a snippet I found long ago, in the mists of time – take it or leave it:

Jewish scripture says that the Temple can’t be rebuilt until the Messiah is imminent. The Roman Emperor Julian wanted to rebuild it and got someone called Alypius of Antioch to do it, along with the governor of the province.

Every time they tried to rebuild, balls of fire broke out near the foundations and burnt the workmen. It got so bad that they had to give the idea up. Not only that but Julian himself was killed around that time.

This was the time of the Galilean Earthquake of 363, hence the flames.

This one is more extensive, no room to reprint all of it but an excerpt below will suffice for now:

First Kings 1:38-39:

”So Zadok the priest, Nathan the prophet, Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, the Cherethites and the Pelethites went down and had Solomon ride on King David’s mule and took him to Gihon. Then Zadok, the priest took a horn of oil from the tabernacle and anointed Solomon….”

The Bible is actually saying here that Solomon was taken to the Gihon Spring and at that very spot the priest enters the tabernacle that held the Ark of the Covenant and gets oil to anoint the newly crowned king.” The tabernacle with the ark in its hold was at Gihon Spring in the City of David at Zion.

This event happened at the same Gihon Spring where David set the tent tabernacle most assuredly in very close proximity to the threshing floor area.

Aristeas, a visitor from Egypt who recorded a description of the temple and Jerusalem about fifty years after Alexander the Great. He was memorialized by Eusebius, who quoted him as observing,

”There is an inexhaustible reservoir of water, as would be expected from an abundant spring gushing up naturally from within the [temple].”

This prodigious water that was seen by Aristeas in the temple was witnessed long before the two aqueducts were built in the time of the Hasmoneans (the Maccabees) as well as Pilate, to channel water to Jerusalem from the south of Bethlehem.

Tacitus, the Roman historian,400 years after Aristeas and recorded that the temple at Jerusalem had a natural spring of water that welled from its interior.Again, these references could only be describing the Gihon Spring.

It is located close to what is referred to as the Ophel, which is a bulge of the earth abutting the City of David (Zion) laying just to the south, and roughly about 1,000 feet, from the Temple Mount. There is no other such spring(s) anywhere else in Jerusalem. However, there is a place called the En-Rogel which is situated about a third of a mile southeast of the City of David, but this is not a spring at all, rather a well. The spring connection, especially a robust gushing spring, seems to be like a laser pointer aimed at the City of David and not at the Temple Mount as the temple site.

Another fascinating verse that makes it irrefutable that a spring/fountain needs to be a fundamental component of the temple location:

”A fountain shall flow from the house of the Lord…” (Joel 3:18).

Can it be any clearer that a water source (spring/fountain) flows from the House of the Lord (temple) which held the Ark of the Covenant? This verse is more solidly dogmatic in its pronouncements because it says unequivocally that a spring flows from the temple.

The temple would logically need a prodigious amount of water (Gihon Spring) for cleaning up after all the animal blood sacrifices. Gihon Spring is the only spot that has enough water for the temple sacrifices in all of Jerusalem.

It appears that the Roman garrison could not obtain water from this spring because it was holy water for temple usage. If the Romans even tried to take one drop, it would result in violent rioting, so they were forced to bring water from south of Bethlehem, as they did via aqueducts that fed the many underground cisterns storage at the purported fort.

Continued in Part nine.

The Jews 1
The Jews 2
The Jews 3
The Jews 4
The Jews 5
The Jews 6
The Jews 7
The Jews 8
The Jews 9
The Jews 10
The Jews 11

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