Plastic bollox

There is the ‘evidence’ of one side behind the global scam which translates into money for those milking the issue.  There is reaction against this, which translates into denying anything happening at all.

There is anecdotal evidence, notoriously fragmented, even if there is no agenda.  They mention the Mersey – I’m not on the Mersey but near to the Manchester Canal – when we go for drives, we see many rivers, from the Dee to the Mersey to those further north and south and I certainly do not see a plastic strewn wasteland of plastic.

Interesting that the leftist Independent has this:

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/plastic-oceans-pollution-microplastics-evidence-harm-recycling-dumping-waste-a8275416.html

Plastics in oceans are mounting, but evidence on harm is surprisingly weak. Unsupported speculation can lead to scarce resources being misdirected when they could be better spent on other environmental issues

That might be getting closer to it. The nature of rivers is that they flow in and out at amazing speed in some cases – the Mersey can be around 7 knots at full flow and in places – 10 knots. [Therefore any sailboat needs to be capable of more than that.]

Waste in the water is going to accumulate near banks, it’s not going to hang about in the middle of the flow. Having said that, there’s little doubt that people are pigs, not even as hygienic as pigs and it’s interesting that the worst areas for human garbage are leftist – places where Labour or the Dems are in control. There’s more civic pride in more salubrious areas.

So there are half truths – the left makes a huge noise about pollution but causes most of it and around these parts, they’re right pigs; the right does not say much but nonetheless has this civic pride – I’ll always look for a bin to put the rubbish or else take it home. My parents used this mulcher device.

Against that, I don’t see all that much rubbish strewn on footpaths around here – sometimes, yes and it’s dealt with, meaning the miscreants are. The wind takes most of it and it can build up in corners.

7 comments for “Plastic bollox

  1. Mark
    June 19, 2019 at 14:53

    I’m a “global warming” denier, not a denier that human activity has effects.

    My gripe with “global warming” (sorry, I’ll use the original political label not the subsequent “climate change” or “climate chaos” revisions) is that the “solutions” to this invented problem prevent real solutions to real ones. And it makes real problems worse.

    The same odour of rodent surrounds this whole plastic thing.

    But you find rats in sewers and if politics these days is anything, it’s a sewer.

  2. woodsy42
    June 19, 2019 at 15:21

    I’m of a mind with Mark about what I see as stupid ‘solutions’ to the negligible problem of CO2.
    I think with plastic there is plastic waste – bags, bottles, lumps, which is essentially litter and large enough to create a mess and a hazard to animals and fish – problem!
    There is also this so-called microplastic which can be injested but is essentially unreactive and just passes through, in the same way as sand grains in a seaside sandwich. – probably not a problem!
    But as microplastic can be found everywhere the ready made propaganda is sitting there ready made for the alarmist/controllers and will be used to enact more stupid solutions, even though the simple solution is to increase fines for littering.

  3. Wolfie
    June 19, 2019 at 15:39

    This article that is doing the rounds is based on poor research but the problem does exist in the UK and it is serious but it perhaps doesn’t fit the standard narrative.

    Microplastics are entering the fresh water supply in the UK due the motor car and the network of roads that span this overcrowded island. Tires grind themselves down on the road surfaces leaving a fine layer of microparticles, the rain then washes these into drains and rivers in even quite rural parts of the country. There is evidence that this is then accumulating in the silt of the streams and rivers and thus getting into the bodies of fresh-water life which then accumulates in the bodies of predators.

  4. Pensieveat
    June 19, 2019 at 15:54

    Plastics aren’t going to go away, so possibly, more investment is required in how to deal with the problem. France has been using shredded car tyres in road construction for over 30 years and is experimenting with using plastic waste. India has been using plastic waste in road construction as has, I understand, China.
    I have no idea how many firms in the UK are working on using plastic waste on our roads, but there aren’t enough. A little investment from central government could, in a comparatively short time, sort out the 3rd world conditions of our potholed roads. Well, Road Research Institute, what say you?

  5. ivan
    June 19, 2019 at 16:26

    It is interesting to note that the 10 rivers labelled as ‘most polluted are in China – the place where the west sent most of their garbage to be ‘recycled’, Africa and the Indian sub continent. The Yangtze, The Hai He and the Yellow River, The Pearl River, The Amur, The Mekong, The Nile, The Niger, The Indus and The Ganges. The Indian rivers mainly runs through Pakistan and Bangladesh.

    Yes, it can look a mess but SJWs virtue signalling or UN departments wanting billions to clean it up is not the answer and never will be.

    Any apparent harm is hyped by those with vested interests, pictures are cropped to make them more ‘meaningful’ and pushed by the MSM as part of the UN global warming/climate change/climate whatever it is today fear campaign to get more of our money and help them with their aspirations to head a one world government.

  6. The Underdoug
    June 20, 2019 at 09:55

    If you can stomach the language in places, the satire is worthwhile – the end is worth the wait (you need to pay attention, though):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo8qXxnFuRQ

  7. June 20, 2019 at 10:12

    Right.

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