Vicissitudes of someone trying to escape Windows

Microdave did not want to escape windows 7, it was working fine, but you know what they’re up to – no longer supporting, trying to get people into W10. This was the previous post on it:

After battling for more than a week, I’ve come to the realisation that Linux is not “user friendly” in any way shape or form. Simple matters like finding that the “Rubbish Bin” isn’t even visible by default are just a start. Making a desktop shortcut is not a simple “Right-click” and “Send To” method, and as for adding software – tough luck if the one you want isn’t listed in the Software Manager.

You are then faced with downloading a “Tarball”, then extracting and “Running” it, as so many posts gleefully explain – except THERE IS NO ****** “RUN” OPTION in the right click menu. You have to faff about making sure the .bin file has “executable” status before there’s any chance of getting it to do something.

Otherwise it’s the programmers delight of “Terminal” and lines of intimidating code. That is assuming there is a “Help” text file in the extracted folder… And if you want to remove said programme you can’t simply go to a Windows style list and select “Remove” (or use the excellent “Revo Uninstaller”).

Sorry, but there’s a reason why Linux is a “niche” O/S – unless you are happy to accept the default settings, and recommended software, it’s basically a coders environment.

This is the update:

Hope your blood pressure is under better control than mine. I thought you might like to know that I (eventually) registered and posted on the Ubuntu forum, and the first reply suggested my Thunderbird woes could be due to Linux not “Mounting” the Windows NTFS volumes on start-up.

He was right, but I would never have guessed without the pointer. Since all the partitions show in “Computer” as soon as the O/S is running I suggest it would be reasonable to assume that they are already accessible.

Apparently not – I have to actually access a file from the partition that my emails are stored in before Thunderbird can “see” them, and there is no message to say that the volume has to be mounted before it’s readable.

As to a permanent solution – that’s where my “Rant” continues. I thought that creating a shortcut would speed things up, but there is no “Right Click” option, as I bitched about previously. And I’m not alone in my disgust:

https://www.officetutes.com/how-to-create-desktop-shortcuts-in-linux-mint/

The last-but-one comment says it all:

“This is the sort of thing that keeps people from ditching Windows for Linux.
Do you have any idea how absolutely absurd it is to have to go through all of that just to create a bloody shortcut?

It’s astonishing that these advanced GUI Linux releases even came into existence when their creators can’t even comprehend the importance of implementing basic copy, move & shortcut functionality.”

But it doesn’t end there – my first effort merely created a “Copy” on the desktop, which is no use because that doesn’t access the second drive. When I read the link above I found the “proper” method it didn’t work either, because the shortcut can’t access the bloody drive either – until it is mounted!!!

Another comment mentioned making the drive “Mount” automatically, but guess what – more extremely complicated instructions involving dozens of lines of code running in Terminal. Sorry, but my eyes glaze over and the blood pressure quickly rises, as soon as I see an answer like that.

There is a small GUI based alternative, but one reply cautioned against relying on Google hits when dealing with Linux. Fair comment, but the proggy mentioned in my posting on the forum is listed in the Software Manager – which is where we are told to head when wanting any “extras”.

Now (perhaps) you can see my frustration, downright anger even, when dealing with this MS “Alternative”. I certainly don’t want to go down the Windows 10 route, as the well known problems with forced updates borking stuff – and the hideous desktop – are probably as bad (or worse).

However the folks behind Linux, and so many other softwares – Yes Mozilla, you as well – really need to remove their heads from their collectives arses, and listen to what their users are saying. There is some brilliant stuff about, but an awful lot of dross as well…

How to escape W10?

15 comments for “Vicissitudes of someone trying to escape Windows

  1. QM
    January 24, 2020 at 08:46

    Nothing wrong with Windows 10. Linux is crap and doesn’t run anything really useful (like office) and Mac-Os is simply dire.

    • Harry J
      January 24, 2020 at 14:15

      I lose the will to live whenever I’m faced with using Windows. I rarely have problems with Mac OS. Out of interest, what do you find ‘dire’ about it?

    • robbo (with the small r,s)
      January 25, 2020 at 10:03

      My copy of linux mint contains something called libre office, and it opens microsoft documents.

  2. ivan
    January 24, 2020 at 09:11

    So speaks someone that has been brainwashed in the ‘windows way’.

    I haven’t run windows since the DOS version of win 3 and strange as it may seem I don’t miss it. In fact I get all those friends using office that have problems asking me to fix the problem because what I use ‘just works’.

    For those using win 10 I feel pity – all their private information is slurped by Microsoft ‘to help improve the system’, except it doesn’t. Win 10 has more bugs and non working drivers than any previous version of windows.

  3. decnine
    January 24, 2020 at 09:51

    My Windows 7 is working just like always. I also used XP for a long time after MS withdrew support. Have you tried continuing with W7 until something breaks?

    • Mark Matis
      January 24, 2020 at 13:44

      Do you have a network connection when using W7? If so, do you really not realize how at risk you are???

      • microdave
        January 24, 2020 at 15:15

        “Do you have a network connection when using W7? If so, do you really not realize how at risk you are???”

        Yes, and probably (for now) at no more risk than running an O/S which (so we are told) doesn’t need Anti Virus. And the latter is a situation that I intend to put right fairly soon. Pretending that users are at very low risk, because of how it works – and primarily due to the small user base – is, I feel, a bit of a “Head in the Sand” attitude. There are ALWAYS new vulnerabilities being developed, and some are targeting Non MS products. I have always run a two-way firewall and A/V on my PC’s. The router provides an additional barrier, and it has UPnP disabled (but how many people do – or even know what that is?). Steve Gibson’s “Shields Up” confirms that no ports are visible from outside. I get very little spam, and don’t open attachments or links unless from people I know. Nothing will guarantee your computers safety – short of total isolation, both electronically & physically – but common sense mitigates most risk.

      • microdave
        January 24, 2020 at 15:21

        “Do you have a network connection when using W7?”

        Yes, for now.

        “If so, do you really not realize how at risk you are???”

        Probably (for now) at no more risk than running an O/S which (so we are told) doesn’t need Anti Virus. And the latter is a situation that I intend to put right fairly soon. Pretending that users are at very low risk, because of how an O/S works – and primarily due to the small user base – is, I feel, a bit of a “Head in the Sand” attitude. There are ALWAYS new vulnerabilities being developed, and some are targeting Non MS products.

        I have always run a two-way firewall and A/V on my PC’s. The router provides an additional barrier, and it has UPnP disabled (but how many people do – or even know what that is?). Steve Gibson’s “Shields Up” confirms that no ports are visible from outside. I get very little spam, and don’t open attachments or links unless from people I know. Nothing will guarantee your computers safety – short of total isolation, both electronically & physically – but common sense mitigates most risk.

  4. January 24, 2020 at 11:09

    XP was my fave, it worked fine for what I wanted but I can’t comment on security. At the same time, the Mac was fine – those were the days before serious hacking.

    This little second hand laptop I think has 8.1 .

  5. FrankH
    January 24, 2020 at 12:17

    Linux is NOT Windows. https://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

    If you want an operating system that behaves exactly like Windows, use Windows.

  6. microdave
    January 24, 2020 at 12:59

    I would happily go back to XP if it was still being supported, but Win7 (with tweaks like “Classic Shell”) is fine. I manged to keep the “Telemetry” updates off it, and haven’t had any problems with other updates borking things – something W10 is well known for. However I have made a point of NOT installing the full “Quality” updates that MS offer automatically, and locate the “Security Only” ones from their site instead. I always make image backups before any major changes, just in case.

    I have no intention of getting rid of the Win7 partition – hence the dual-boot arrangement. Over the course of several years I have installed many programmes that I’m familiar with (even if only occasionally), which most likely don’t have equivalents on Linux, and it’s easier to swap from one O/S to the other, rather than spend countless more hours trying to find & configure something in an unfamiliar environment.

    I’m not about to convert all my storage and to EXT4 for the same reason, hence my desire to get Thunderbird working on the new O/S, yet able to “See” all the existing files. Having discovered that NTFS partitions aren’t “Mounted” automatically in Linux, I have now found there’s a right click option when in “Computer” which I am going to invoke each time I start it. It’s not perfect, but only takes a few seconds, and I would rather do this than begin editing config settings, at least not until I’m considerably more confident with the new system. Shame they removed the right click “Desktop Shortcut” option that was present in earlier versions…

  7. Ed P
    January 24, 2020 at 19:45

    If you want to change, it’s possible to change to Win10 from Win7 for free (& with a uSoft licence upgrade included). A simple net search will show how.

  8. Geoffrey Miller
    January 25, 2020 at 08:44

    Download and run “O&O ShutUp10” after installing Windows 10 to regain some measure of control.

    • microdave
      January 25, 2020 at 12:24

      Thanks for that, Geoffrey – duly bookmarked, and a necessity along with “Classic Shell” or it’s replacement “Open Shell”. After a couple of weeks “experimenting” with Mint, I’ve reluctantly come to the realisation that it simply won’t provide anything like what I have been used to, no matter how much “tweaking” I carry out. The final nail in the proverbial coffin was last night, when I found that “4Pane” – touted as a “Linux equivalent of Q-Dir” (a brilliant file manager), is nothing of the sort. None of the Linux alternatives offer a fraction of what Q-Dir does, and that doesn’t even need installing – it’s freeware and runs perfectly as a “Portable” programme. Their website reports that it can be used with an emulator like “Wine” but I’m not that desperate!

      I have far too many folders, documents, images, video & audio files to be buggering about trying to locate them with the dreary default icons, and (apparent) lack of display options I’ve seen so far. And the few display choices there are won’t remain selected for the next time you open a particular folder. Maybe there are ways to rectify this, but I’m not going to spend hours, days or even weeks searching for the answers. On this Win 7 PC, as with XP before it, videos show the VLC “Traffic Cone”, PDF’s my chosen reader – “PDF-Viewer”, Audio files the “foobar2000” logo, etc – all without my needing to do anything. It is taken care of when installing a programme, at most needing a box ticked to make it the default application.

      Sorry, but anyone claiming that learning to use Terminal will open up the full possibilities of my PC is living in a different universe – the majority of computer users just want to get on with life, not have to learn coding.

      @ Ed P – I was already aware of that, but since this laptop has now developed a keyboard fault I think a replacement machine is the way to go. I will keep this one as a back up…

  9. January 25, 2020 at 12:44

    I use Libre Office and it usually works fine, sometimes crashes.

    Thanks to all who added to this. If you have something you’d like to put up, we’ll put in a guestpost on it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.