Category: Earth and cosmos

green issues, geology, geography, space, astronomy

Warble gloaming

There are some topics which you can get into however many years down the track you look at them, there are some that, unless you started from the ground up, you’re gone trying to make head or tail of it, let alone know the heroes and villains.

I only know this Gavin is a villain because Chuckles had that in his heading, and that presumably makes this Judith Curry a goodie but I might have it wrong.

Gavin has a post up in which he rebuts Judith Curry’s response to comments about her testimony at the Committee hearing.

I did read down it but without, as mentioned before, all the background, I couldn’t possibly comment but please, be my guest and let’s debate climate.

What I do know is that the Donald came into this presidency with one plank being he would sign out of any climate scam agreement but that daughter dear is now trying to get him to backpeddle on that.… More here ...

Cats

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/pets/news-features/cats-ancient-enemies-progress-civilisation/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cats_and_the_Internet

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakeneko

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cats_(musical)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macavity

In ancient Egypt they mummified cats, and in Britain we give them jobs. Tewkesbury town council has put itself ahead of the curve on inter-species cooperation by employing a cat, Missy, as a “morale officer” to cheer up its staff. Now Missy may have to work from home because the mayor, Karen Brennan, fears they are wasting too much time playing with the cat instead of working.

We all know cats are freeloaders. As one of the few domestic species to allegedly have domesticated themselves, there is a reasonable case to be made that we are their pets – or perhaps their equivalent of a basic income scheme. They have organised their affairs so that we provide food and shelter in return for little tangible value. No wonder the sci-fi author Charlie Stross refers to cats as parasites and humans as their “hosts”.

But the true situation is much graver.

More here ...

Blueberry cuttings [3]

The series of posts: One, two, three.  This is his Part 4, previously here, here and here –  we seem to have missed a part at N.O., just to complete the confusion.

After finding that twig, we noticed that our cats have paid inordinate attention to the planter box. Not seeing any signs of litter boxing, we assumed all was well. Not so. Here is an action shot of Ultimo inspecting the planters:

Sure enough, within moments of the above photo, Ultimo (or Oruchimo in Japanese, roughly translated), performed a kitty full-body rub and twisted the big stalk through about 120 degrees counterclockwise, narrowly missing the nice little clump on the saddle twig to the left. Sadly, that big woody piece was our best performing cutting. It is still hanging in there, but we’ll see.

Hell it’s exciting, the world of horticulture!

[Chuckles is to be forever condemned thanked for this series]… More here ...

Ripples in the space time continuum

Sure this will mean a lot to you:

When he learned of LIGO’s first detection, Afshordi began to explore whether the gravitational waves emitted from a black-hole merger could reveal intimate details about what happens near the black-hole horizon. At first it seemed too much to hope for. ‘I didn’t really think we could see quantum gravity effects in the gravitational-wave signal because we had already looked in so many places,’ Afshordi said. ‘But I changed my mind about this.’

What made Afshordi reconsider was work by Vítor Cardoso and colleagues at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Portugal on gravitational-wave echoes from black holes. Cardoso had laid out on general grounds that a merger of two objects that are compact but do not have an event horizon would produce gravitational waves very similar to those of black holes – similar, but not identical.… More here ...

Blueberry cuttings [2]

The series of posts: One, two, three.

Eagerly awaited second instalment:

The idea here is to put the larger stems through these holes to help them remain vertical in the cups. It isn’t perfect, they’ll still slop to the side a bit, but it is much better than counting on potting soil alone.

Now, it is time for the cuttings themselves. We used the tower tips to hold the longer cuttings, and just dropped the small cuttings into the cups. Try to be careful to put the cuttings in right side up. We’ve done this several times, and still managed to get a couple of them upside down!

You’ll need to get over there for the rest of it.  Rivetting stuff.

[H/T Chuckles]… More here ...

Away from Paris

Noticed in this travel guide the usuals – not all that safe in Paris right now – but there were also some others out in the rest of France, such as:

[Pic]

Verdon Gorge (Moustiers Ste. Marie)

Often referred to as “The Grand Canyon of Europe”, the Verdon Gorge offers many activities such as rock-climbing, kayak-canoeing, mountain-biking and camping, and the nearby 5th century town of Moustiers Ste. Marie is the perfect place to relax after such strenuous activities.

Moustiers Ste. Marie is pretty remote, so make sure you have the right travel gear to go by car. The nearest larger town is Castellane (44.5 km), the nearest big city Nice (150 km) which has its own airport. (Take a map and a French dictionary, because this one is likely to be an adventure!).

There you go.  My current book [next post] is set south of Paris, so that’s not a long way out.… More here ...