Wednesday

1.  A Washington tweeter put this one up:

Our D.C. office building got a security robot. It drowned itself. We were promised flying cars, instead we got suicidal robots.

2.  Is this Hillsborough all over again?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40635299

3.  Sod off, Khan.  Prepare to be deported.

4.  More wodge bunging:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40628918

5.  Nice piece on the lad hisself [sic], from a US point of view:

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/449537/jacob-rees-mogg-tory-backbencher-bright-political-future

[H/T Chuckles and haiku]

Standing lug [2]

It’s only once you start using something or building it in that you more fully see the advantages/disadvantages.

The disadvantages of the lug are known – the luff [sail’s leading edge] hard to keep taut, the flapping in gale force – but there are ways around that.

For a start, the sail would be reefed in a storm. The trick is to have small areas anyway, as in five sails the same area.

Something I noticed this boat above had was the mast raked back [angled back], not vertical.  How brilliant and here’s why.

Speaking with the ‘refugees’

The interest in this one is that the author is someone very pro-“refugee” who is now waking up:

I’ve Worked with Refugees for Decades. Europe’s Afghan Crime Wave Is Mind-Boggling.

This is not an article that has been fun for me to write. I have worked on issues related to refugees for much of my professional life, from the Pakistani camps during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan to Yemen, Sudan, Thailand, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Lebanon, Bosnia, Nicaragua and Iraq, and have deep sympathy for their plight. But nowhere had I encountered a phenomenon like this one.

In 2014, when waves of refugees began flooding into western Europe, citizens and officials alike responded with generosity and openness. Exhausted refugees spilled out of trains and buses to be met by crowds bearing gifts of clothing and food, and holding up placards that read “Welcome Refugees.”