From the Tory Conference 2

Brian Monteith is speaking at the moment on the Health and Safety ‘creep’ whereby a H&S measure is then applied inappropriately in another area, with add-ons so that we end up with a bizarre situation of banning Marmite for children because it contains too much salt.
The food police, said Roger Helmer, telling us how much alcohol we can take and the Food Police telling the Stilton Cheese producers they must reduce salt [currently 2.2%], have taken the nanny state to ridiculous levels.
So there is the spectacle of parents arriving at school near lunchtime and passing fish ‘n chips through the wire fence while the real police sit in an office ticking boxes and letting the ASBOs have a free run.  The teachers, who should be enforcing the Food Police directives are sitting in the staffroom ticking boxes.
We can’t enjoy a drive without speed cameras, a constant threat, points on a licence [like children getting brownie points.], constant surveillance. – there are so many things challenging our right to free speech.  There was, in Bedfordshire, a call for representations on ‘travellers’.  90% of respondents’ representations were discarded as ‘racist’.  Prosecutions of some respondents was considered on the grounds of hate crimes.
ID cards – to be dropped in their current form. Smoking?  Sadly, there does not seem to be much action there from the Tories.  Simon Clark asked why we need one universal speed limit?  Other countries can electronically display different limits throughout the day but we don’t – we have a 50mph limit on a motorway in the middle of the night with no traffic around – if caught, the book is thrown at you.  The
Conservatives will change that, in line with their commitment to individual freedom, so they say.
Brian Monteith mentioned the seeming competition, lauded by the media, to introduce more draconian laws than the next city, e.g. in Liverpool.  There are publicly funded quangos, e.g. the Scottish recommendation to ban kilts as … get this … wasteful!
Databases – with the Irish approval of the EU state, Brussels has now gone ahead with information sharing across Europe so your NHS details now go to Croatia and thus to the mafia – this is the EU panacea the Irish have ushered in.
In the centre here, the organizers went to shift chairs around.  Oh no, they were told – Elfansafetee says someone might get hurt doing that.  So the chairs had to remain higgledy-piggleby.
Freedom Charter – can create more problems than it solves.  I can vouch for that with Bloghounds – less rules and stated ‘musts’ are better.  That word again – common sense.
More later

Brian Monteith is speaking at the moment on the Health and Safety ‘creep’ whereby a H&S measure is then applied inappropriately in another area, with add-ons so that we end up with a bizarre situation of banning Marmite for children because it contains too much salt.

The food police, said Roger Helmer, telling us how much alcohol we can take and the Food Police telling the Stilton Cheese producers they must reduce salt [currently 2.2%], have taken the nanny state to ridiculous levels.

So there is the spectacle of parents arriving at school near lunchtime and passing fish ‘n chips through the wire fence while the real police sit in an office ticking boxes and letting the ASBOs have a free run.  The teachers, who should be enforcing the Food Police directives are sitting in the staffroom ticking boxes.

We can’t enjoy a drive without speed cameras, a constant threat, points on a licence [like children getting brownie points.], constant surveillance. – there are so many things challenging our right to free speech.  There was, in Bedfordshire, a call for representations on ‘travellers’.  90% of respondents’ representations were discarded as ‘racist’.  Prosecutions of some respondents was considered on the grounds of hate crimes.

ID cards – to be dropped in their current form. Smoking?  Sadly, there does not seem to be much action there from the Tories.  Simon Clark asked why we need one universal speed limit?  Other countries can electronically display different limits throughout the day but we don’t – we have a 50mph limit on a motorway in the middle of the night with no traffic around – if caught, the book is thrown at you.  The

Conservatives will change that, in line with their commitment to individual freedom, so they say.

Brian Monteith mentioned the seeming competition, lauded by the media, to introduce more draconian laws than the next city, e.g. in Liverpool.  There are publicly funded quangos, e.g. the Scottish recommendation to ban kilts as … get this … wasteful!

Databases – with the Irish approval of the EU state, Brussels has now gone ahead with information sharing across Europe so your NHS details now go to Croatia and thus to the mafia – this is the EU panacea the Irish have ushered in.

In the centre here, the organizers went to shift chairs around.  Oh no, they were told – Elfansafetee says someone might get hurt doing that.  So the chairs had to remain higgledy-piggleby.

Freedom Charter – can create more problems than it solves.  I can vouch for that with Bloghounds – less rules and stated ‘musts’ are better.  That word again – common sense.

More later

Courtesy of Andrew Allison

Monday evening puzzle

Solution to last evening’s:

Fever, queue, zoo, mat, speaker, person, backgammon, house, wax, jury, diligent.

This evening’s:

allgreekWhich is the odd letter out?

Solution same time tomorrow evening.

From the Tory Conference 1

As I write, Chris Grayling is cutting the ribbon for the Freedom Zone and the bubbly is flowing.  Tim Montgomerie is speaking on patriotism and the ignorance of British history.  He mentions a woman who said that she wanted her child to have a decent education, to celebrate Christmas again and so on.  So that’s why she would vote BNP.
Last evening, there was a fabulous speech by Ray Mallon, Mayor of Middlesboprough, the gyst of which was:
Thorndyke said that the way to make a man aggressive is to make him frustrated and many of us are most frustrated by the rule of bureaucracy and the abrogation of responsibility by people like Jacqui Smith and others to the bureaucracy which, in turn, colours the entire culture we’re living n today.
We are in a Civil Service State and dealing with matters like crime is being carried out at local level, for example in |Middlesborough, despite the government, not in partnership with it.  The police focus should not be about terrorism – it should be primarily about anti-social behaviour.
Think about if you think you’ll be the victim of a terrorist attack today.  In principle, maybe.  Think about if you’ll possibly meet or see anti-social behaviour some time today.  More likely.  The Pilkington case  is to the point here – the total lack of acceptance of responsibility by those who by rights should have – indicative of the whole thrust of this government – to speak of service from you and me, to demand KPIs be met but not once does anyone put up his hand and say, ‘The buck stops here.’
The mindlessness of solutions today – overreaction in some cases, such as the 11 year old girl who stole a fiver from her mother and was arrested, fingerprinted and so on, taking those police officers off the street where they should be and tying them up in paperwork, through to going easy on convicted criminals on the early release or non-incarceration the Labour way.  They can never find the happy medium – they can never  use common sense.  They follow a prescribed table of penalties with no provision for that outdated word ‘discretion’.
Next year, said the Shadow Minister for Home Affairs [and I spoke with him later, to one side of the room] the KPIs will be the first to go.  There will be a strong move to elect the police commissioners and to induct new officers at multiple entry points in an effort to get the police back on the street [13% of their time at the moment] and work on prevention rather than big stick punishments which are then set aside in the case of the guilty.
Back to the current forum and I’ve just put a question to Chris Grayling on patriotism – what will the Conservative government do to reverse the teaching of a distorted view of our heritage and of values in general.  He replied that the teaching of our history is a major priority and the process of selection of teachers according to the ideology of relativism, though far gone, can be begun to be tackled
A young man near me here chimed in with that question of  what is actually taught now in secondary and higher education – largely useless and politically biased.  Many in the audience applauded..
The overwhelming mood in the audiences I have so far seen is deep anger at our situation and last evening, one lady asked what the [Shadow] Minister intended to do.  The Minister said that that would have to be pondered.
‘Pondered!?’ exploded the lady and the room erupted.  ‘.’Ponder3ed?    It’s action we need.’
The  Mps were left in no doubt about the mood of the people at this conference.  Today, it was good to see Chris Grayling come to grips with this.
More tomorrow.

As I write, Chris Grayling is cutting the ribbon for the Freedom Zone and the bubbly is flowing.  Tim Montgomerie is speaking on patriotism and the ignorance of British history.  He mentions a woman who said that she wanted her child to have a decent education, to celebrate Christmas again and so on.  So that’s why she would vote BNP.

Last evening, there was a fabulous speech by Ray Mallon, Mayor of Middlesboprough, the gyst of which was:

Thorndyke said that the way to make a man aggressive is to make him frustrated and many of us are most frustrated by the rule of bureaucracy and the abrogation of responsibility by people like Jacqui Smith and others to the bureaucracy which, in turn, colours the entire culture we’re living n today.

We are in a Civil Service State and dealing with matters like crime is being carried out at local level, for example in |Middlesborough, despite the government, not in partnership with it.  The police focus should not be about terrorism – it should be primarily about anti-social behaviour.

Think about if you think you’ll be the victim of a terrorist attack today.  In principle, maybe.  Think about if you’ll possibly meet or see anti-social behaviour some time today.  More likely.  The Pilkington case  is to the point here – the total lack of acceptance of responsibility by those who by rights should have – indicative of the whole thrust of this government – to speak of service from you and me, to demand KPIs be met but not once does anyone put up his hand and say, ‘The buck stops here.’

The mindlessness of solutions today – overreaction in some cases, such as the 11 year old girl who stole a fiver from her mother and was arrested, fingerprinted and so on, taking those police officers off the street where they should be and tying them up in paperwork, through to going easy on convicted criminals on the early release or non-incarceration the Labour way.  They can never find the happy medium – they can never  use common sense.  They follow a prescribed table of penalties with no provision for that outdated word ‘discretion’.

Next year, said the Shadow Minister for Home Affairs [and I spoke with him later, to one side of the room] the KPIs will be the first to go.  There will be a strong move to elect the police commissioners and to induct new officers at multiple entry points in an effort to get the police back on the street [13% of their time at the moment] and work on prevention rather than big stick punishments which are then set aside in the case of the guilty.

Back to the current forum and I’ve just put a question to Chris Grayling on patriotism – what will the Conservative government do to reverse the teaching of a distorted view of our heritage and of values in general.  He replied that the teaching of our history is a major priority and the process of selection of teachers according to the ideology of relativism, though far gone, can be begun to be tackled

A young man near me here chimed in with that question of  what is actually taught now in secondary and higher education – largely useless and politically biased.  Many in the audience applauded..

The overwhelming mood in the audiences I have so far seen is deep anger at our situation and last evening, one lady asked what the [Shadow] Minister intended to do.  The Minister said that that would have to be pondered.

‘Pondered!?’ exploded the lady and the room erupted.  ‘.’Ponder3ed?    It’s action we need.’

The  Mps were left in no doubt about the mood of the people at this conference.  Today, it was good to see Chris Grayling come to grips with this.

More later.

Courtesy of Andrew Allison

Russia and misconceptions about it

Russia

Ross Fountain is a good lad but he shares the same misconceptions with the rest of our countrymen about Russia.  He wrote:

Of the world’s 30 largest economies only China, Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia are not democratic and 3 of those are dependent on natural resources rather than human capital for their wealth.

I replied:

Russia’s not democratic?

It’s more democratic than Britain. They voted in booths with no CCTV and the folded slips wennet in the boxes. They could have written anything.

There is no infringement of liberties such as wheelie bin laws, ID cards etc.and they have one precious freedom which Britain does not – a non-litigious society and freedom of speech on most issues.

If you criticize Putin within your circle, they don’t come to take you away.

Having recently returned, this is like the UKSSR here.

Brazil and paperwork

The Quiet Man writes of paperwork:

Paperwork is the bane of my life, it prevents me from actually doing the job I’m being paid for (yes I know paperwork is necessary on occasion) by keeping me in an office filling out forms rather than fixing/maintaining the equipment I’m in charge of. All in all though it takes up about 10% of my time or 5 hours over the 4 days I’m on.

The Python film Brazil summed up the mindless expansion of the state bureaucracy:

The Philippines – tsunamis, quakes and foreign troops

philippines

The Asia Times reports:

The arrival of about 3,000 US Marines in the Philippines next week for training and humanitarian missions in the wake of recent floods has some Filipino officials wary that the soldiers could be diverted to war-torn Sulu island, where Islamic extremists recently killed two US soldiers. The scheduled deployment represents five times the number of US troops currently stationed in the Philippines.

The extremists:

The Abu Sayyaf, which has become notorious for kidnap-for-ransom incidents and beheading its victims, including one American businessman, was founded in the early 1990s by a group of young
Filipino
Muslim radicals after fighting as mujahideen in the Afghanistan war against the former Soviet Union in the 1980s.

The rebel group has also recently started to use rocket-propelled grenades, which, the
military
said, came from foreign sources, including Vietnam. Despite reports of setbacks, Abu Sayyaf is far from being defeated because new, young and radical Muslim recruits are believed to have taken over from leaders killed in recent skirmishes with the
military
.

One wonders how many places the Americans can be sent into around the world until they, like the Roman empire, become dangerously overextended.