The many heads of the monster

One of the most dismaying things in our pursuit of truth is someone coming in and categorically opening in comments with: “Nope [it’s nothing to do with that], it’s …” and he details his view.

Because it very much IS what he’s just dismissed out of hand, plus it’s ALSO about what he is about to say, plus it’s ALSO other elements, not unlike heads of the same hydra entwining, parallel, tangled together, writhing.

Take these recent threads:

# Phil Haney, Michelle B and the MB
# Rotherham grooming gangs
# Plod and social services
# Common Purpose’s refusal to pursue crimes
# Belgian and Vatican paedo crimes
# Weinstein and Hollywood
# The Ashkenazi non-Jew and world mayhem
# The climate scam
# Polly and her investigations

The Boeing 707 days

From North Star over My Shoulder: A Flying Life (Buck, Bob) Bob flew from 1930 to 1974, from DC 2’s (Yes, 2s) to 747s)

Courtesy SAARP newsletter

I attended a reunion party in Paris, many years after retirement; sitting next to me at dinner was Nicole Sargent Kappler, one of our original French hostesses, still lovely with big expressive brown eyes, a very intelligent lady.

“Tell me, Bob,” she asked, “what was the best time of our flying?” Without a moment’s deliberation I said, “The 707 days.”

Plot holes and ill thought-out arcs

Via Chuckles, Steve Sailer looks at fictional and true stories:

https://www.unz.com/isteve/plot-holes-in-fictional-stories-vs-true-stories/

This post is about fictional and the deep annoyance at plot holes and ill thought out story arcs, e.g. Doctor Who, e.g. Andromeda, e.g. just so many lazily worked through arcs and plots.

There’s a bit of stick in this, an edge shall we say, because I’m currently plunged into redacting my entire long book – at the time of writing, I’ve got up to 2:20.

I’d go so far as to say that in a book that length, with that many wholesale changes in direction over twenty years, you’re going to get at least a few anomalies and sure enough, in 2:17, there are some doozies.

There’s a main protagonist called Emma, a honey, and she was fine until part three when she started doing such stupid things, wrong things, brought to her partner’s attention but because the plot demanded she be there at the end, there either had to be an epiphany to sustain the continuing bad person idiocies and he still loving her … or else there had to be a radical change.